Break Out Bloggers – Sharing the Love

Diane awarded me with the Break Out Bloggers award today, which gives me the opportunity to post about the great upswing in activity I’ve been experiencing the past month or so and it also allows me to hopefully direct that attention elsewhere as well.

First of all, thank you all so much for coming here to read my various writings, to gawk at my crude drawings, or to just say hello. You all keep me going here. This here blog received a record 370 visits yesterday, which is amazing. My post, Frank – A Halloween Short Story, was read by 159 people! On my best months, this blog averages around 2000 visitors. This month I am near 6,000! Here’s a graph, just for the heck of it:

monthgraph.jpg

I hope this trend continues.

I’d also like to point you to a couple blogs you all might not know about. Julie K. Rose has been talking NaNoWriMo in the past few days, which in addition to her Word-Hoard posts and Myths, folklore & symbolism posts make her blog one you should be reading.

Miss Jane has been writing some really good posts about writing craft, many of which you should read before NaNoWriMo. In addition to those, she has also offered to edit your story for free. I plan on taking her up on this and maybe you will too.

Finally, have you seen D L Ennis’s photographs? I could write an entire novel based on any one of them. Take a look at Picnic in the Mist. See what I mean?

These are just a few of the blogs who I think are Breaking Out. If I didn’t mention your blog, please don’t be offended. I enjoy yours as much as any of these. I’m relatively new to these and figured you might be as well.

Finally, don’t forget to check out my other post today, Fairy Tales; Their Origin and Meaning by John Thackray Bunce.

Again, thank you all for reading. Please continue.

Fairy Tales; Their Origin and Meaning by John Thackray Bunce

I did a search on the word “Fairy” at Project Gutenberg the other day and came across the book: Fairy Tales; Their Origin and Meaning by John Thackray Bunce, originally published in the late 1800’s. Here is some wonderful text from the beginning of the book:

We are going into Fairy Land for a little while, to see what we can find there to amuse and instruct us this Christmas time. Does anybody know the way? There are no maps or guidebooks, and the places we meet with in our workaday world do not seem like the homes of the Fairies. Yet we have only to put on our Wishing Caps, and we can get into Fairy Land in a moment. The house-walls fade away, the winter sky brightens, the sun shines out, the weather grows warm and pleasant; flowers spring up, great trees cast a friendly shade, streams murmur cheerfully over their pebbly beds, jewelled fruits are to be had for the trouble of gathering them; invisible hands set out well-covered dinner-tables, brilliant and graceful forms flit in and out across our path, and we all at once find ourselves in the midst of a company of dear old friends whom we have known and loved ever since we knew anything.

“There are no maps or guidebooks, and the places we meet with in our workaday world do not seem like the homes of the Fairies. Yet we have only to put on our Wishing Caps, and we can get into Fairy Land in a moment.” – That’s the feeling I want to capture in my novel. That encapsulates it right there.  The whole idea of escaping our mundane world to a world of magic, that’s what reading is all about to me.  That’s what I want the reader to feel when they pick up something I have written.